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ReactJS is a popular JavaScript library that allows developers to build user interfaces for web applications. Developed by Facebook, ReactJS is known for its efficient performance and ability to create reusable components that make it easier to manage complex user interfaces.
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How To Hire a Champion ReactJS Developer?

Hiring a champion ReactJS developer requires a combination of technical expertise, soft skills, and a solid hiring process. Here are some tips to help you hire a champion ReactJS developer:
 
  1. Start with a clear job description: Write a detailed job description that includes the required technical skills and experience, as well as soft skills such as communication, problem-solving, and teamwork.
  2. Look for ReactJS-specific skills: Look for developers with experience in building ReactJS applications, including proficiency in React components, state management libraries such as Redux or MobX, and popular front-end technologies such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.
  3. Review their portfolio and code samples: Ask candidates to provide samples of their past work, including code samples and links to live applications. Review their portfolio and code samples to assess their technical abilities and experience.
  4. Conduct technical interviews: Conduct technical interviews that test candidates’ knowledge of ReactJS and its associated technologies. Ask candidates to complete coding exercises or solve problems related to ReactJS and its ecosystem.
  5. Assess soft skills: Evaluate candidates’ soft skills, such as communication, problem-solving, teamwork, and attention to detail. Look for candidates who can work collaboratively with other team members and communicate effectively with stakeholders.
  6. Consider culture fit: Evaluate candidates’ cultural fit by assessing their values, work style, and personality. Look for candidates who share your company’s values and culture.
  7. Offer competitive compensation and benefits: Offer a competitive compensation package and benefits to attract top talent.
 
By following these tips, you can hire a champion ReactJS developer who can help you build high-quality web applications that meet your business needs. Hire now on TechKluster

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All developers on TechKluster are pre-vetted and pre-verified for their skills and background, so you can be sure that the ReactJS developer you hire has the qualifications and experience you need.
Yes, you can hire a ReactJS developer for a short term (minimum 6 months) and long term on TechKluster. For your custom requirements, you can post requisition on the platform and our team will help you to find the right fit.
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Table of Contents

ReactJS Programming Fundamentals

Here's an overview of ReactJS programming fundamentals with detailed code examples:

Components

In ReactJS, a component is a reusable piece of code that defines the user interface. Components can be either functional or class-based. Here's an example of a simple functional component:

				
					
function MyComponent(props) {
  return <div>Hello, {props.name}!</div>;
}
				
			

Here's an example of a class-based component that uses state:

				
					
class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = { count: 0 };
  }

  handleClick() {
    this.setState({ count: this.state.count + 1 });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div><div>Count: {this.state.count}</div><button onClick={() => this.handleClick()}>Increment</button></div>
    );
  }
}
				
			

JSX

JSX is a syntax extension to JavaScript that allows you to write HTML-like code within your JavaScript code. Here's an example of JSX:

				
					
const element = <div className="my-class">Hello, world!</div>;
				
			

Props

Props are short for "properties" and are used to pass data from a parent component to a child component. Here's an example of passing props to a functional component:

				
					
function MyComponent(props) {
  return <div>Hello, {props.name}!</div>;
}

ReactDOM.render(<MyComponent name="John" />, document.getElementById("root"));
				
			

State

State is used to manage data within a component. Here's an example of a class-based component that uses state:

				
					
class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = { count: 0 };
  }

  handleClick() {
    this.setState({ count: this.state.count + 1 });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div><div>Count: {this.state.count}</div><button onClick={() => this.handleClick()}>Increment</button></div>
    );
  }
}
				
			

Lifecycle Methods

ReactJS provides several lifecycle methods that allow you to hook into the component's lifecycle events, such as mounting, updating, and unmounting. Here's an example of using the componentDidMount() lifecycle method:

				
					
class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  componentDidMount() {
    console.log("Component mounted");
  }

  render() {
    return <div>Hello, world!</div>;
  }
}
				
			

Events

ReactJS provides a set of synthetic events that you can use to handle user interactions, such as clicks, mouse movements, and keyboard input. Here's an example of handling a click event:

				
					
class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  handleClick() {
    console.log("Button clicked");
  }

  render() {
    return <button onClick={() => this.handleClick()}>Click me</button>;
  }
}
				
			

These are just some of the fundamental concepts in ReactJS programming. With this knowledge, you can start building your own ReactJS applications.

Simple ReactJS Application

here's a detailed guide to building a ReactJS application that interacts with an external REST API for creating, updating, and retrieving articles from environment setup to deployment.

Step 1: Setting up the Development Environment

Before we start building our ReactJS application, we need to set up our development environment. We will be using Node.js and NPM for this. Follow these steps to set up your development environment:

1. Install Node.js and NPM on your machine. You can download them from the official website: https://nodejs.org/en/download/

2. Once you have installed Node.js and NPM, create a new directory for your project and navigate to it in your terminal.

3. Initialize a new npm project using the command:

				
					
npm init
				
			

4. Install ReactJS and its dependencies using the command:

				
					
npm install --save react react-dom react-router-dom react-scripts
				
			

5. Install Axios, a popular JavaScript library for making HTTP requests:

				
					
npm install axios
				
			

Step 2: Creating the ReactJS Application

Now that we have our development environment set up, we can start building our ReactJS application. Here's how to create a new ReactJS application:

1. Create a new file called index.js in the root directory of your project.

2. In index.js, import the necessary modules:

				
					
import React from 'react';
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';
import App from './App';
import './index.css';
				
			

3. Create a new component called App in a file called App.js:

				
					
import React, { useState, useEffect } from 'react';
import axios from 'axios';

function App() {
  const [articles, setArticles] = useState([]);

  useEffect(() => {
    axios.get('https://my-rest-api.com/articles')
      .then(res => {
        setArticles(res.data);
      })
      .catch(err => {
        console.error(err);
      });
  }, []);

  return (
    <div>
      {articles.map(article => (
        <div key={article.id}><h2>{article.title}</h2><p>{article.content}</p></div>
      ))}
    </div>
  );
}

export default App;
				
			

In this component, we are using the useState and useEffect hooks to manage the state of our articles. We are also using Axios to make a GET request to our REST API and retrieve the articles. Finally, we are rendering the articles in the component.

4. In index.js, render the App component:

				
					
ReactDOM.render(
  <React.StrictMode><App /></React.StrictMode>,
  document.getElementById('root')
);
				
			

Now that we have our basic ReactJS application set up, we can retrieve articles from our REST API. Here's how:

1. In App.js, modify the useEffect hook to retrieve articles from our REST API:

				
					
useEffect(() => {
  axios.get('https://my-rest-api.com/articles')
    .then(res => {
      setArticles(res.data);
    })
    .catch(err => {
      console.error(err);
    });
}, []);
				
			

2. Add a button to the App component that triggers a function to retrieve articles:

				
					
function getArticles() {
  axios.get('https://my-rest-api.com/articles')
    .then(res => {
      setArticles(res.data);
    })
    .catch(err => {
      console.error(err);
    });
}

return (
  <div>
    <button onClick={getArticles}>Get Articles</button>
    {articles.map(article => (
<div key={article.id}>
<h2>{article.title}</h2>
<p>{article.content}</p>
</div>
))}
  </div>
);
				
			

Now, when the user clicks the "Get Articles" button, the getArticles function will be called and the articles will be retrieved from our REST API.

Step 4: Creating Articles

We can also create new articles through our ReactJS application. Here's how:

1. Add a form to the App component that allows the user to create a new article:

				
					
function createArticle(e) {
  e.preventDefault();
  const title = e.target.title.value;
  const content = e.target.content.value;
  axios.post('https://my-rest-api.com/articles', { title, content })
    .then(res => {
      setArticles([...articles, res.data]);
      e.target.reset();
    })
    .catch(err => {
      console.error(err);
    });
}

return (
  <div><form onSubmit={createArticle}><label>
        Title:
        <input type="text" name="title" /></label><br /><label>
        Content:
        <textarea name="content" /></label><br /><button type="submit">Create Article</button></form>
    {articles.map(article => (
      <div key={article.id}><h2>{article.title}</h2><p>{article.content}</p></div>
    ))}
  </div>
);
				
			

In this form, we are using the axios.post method to send a POST request to our REST API and create a new article. We are also using the setArticles function to add the new article to our state.

2. Add a key prop to the div that contains each article:

				
					
{articles.map(article => (
  <div key={article.id}><h2>{article.title}</h2><p>{article.content}</p></div>
))}
				
			

This key prop is necessary for React to keep track of which elements have changed, been added, or been removed.

Step 5: Updating Articles

We can also update existing articles through our ReactJS application. Here's how:

1. Modify the createArticle function to also handle updating articles:

				
					
function createArticle(e) {
  e.preventDefault();
  const title = e.target.title.value;
  const content = e.target.content.value;
  const id = e.target.id.value;
  if (id) {
    axios.put(`https://my-rest-api.com/articles/${id}`, { title, content })
      .then(res => {
        setArticles(articles.map(article => {
          if (article.id === res.data.id) {
            return res.data;
          }
          return article;
        }));
        e.target.reset();
      })
      .catch(err => {
        console.error(err);
      });
  } else {
    axios.post('https://my-rest-api.com/articles', { title, content })
      .then(res => {
        setArticles([...articles, res.data]);
        e.target.reset();
      })
      .catch(err => {
        console.error(err);
      });
  }
}
				
			

In this modified createArticle function, we are checking if the form has an id value. If it does, we send a PUT request to our REST API to update the article. If it doesn't, we send a POST request to create a new article.

2. Modify the App component to add an "Edit" button for each article:

				
					javascriptCopy code
function editArticle(article) {
  setEditing(article);
  document.getElementById('title').value = article.title;
  document.getElementById('content').value = article.content;
}

function cancelEdit() {
  setEditing(null);
  document.getElementById('title').value = '';
  document.getElementById('content').value = '';
}

return (
  <div>
    {editing ? (
      <form onSubmit={createArticle}><input type="hidden" name="id" value={editing.id} /><label>
          Title:
          <input type="text" name="title" id="title" /></label><br /><label>
          Content:
          <textarea name="content" id="content" /></label><br /><button type="submit">Save Article</button><button type="button" onClick={cancelEdit}>Cancel</button></form>
    ) : (
      <form onSubmit={createArticle}><label>
          Title:
          <input type="text" name="title" /></label><br /><label>
          Content:
          <textarea name="content" /></label><br /><button type="submit">Create Article</button></form>
    )}
    {articles.map(article => (
      <div key={article.id}><h2>{article.title}</h2><p>{article.content}</p><button type="button" onClick={() => editArticle(article)}>Edit</button></div>
    ))}
  </div>
);
				
			

In this modified App component, we added an editing state variable to keep track of whether the user is currently editing an article. If they are, we show a form with the article's current values and an option to save or cancel the edit. If they aren't, we show a form to create a new article.

We also added an "Edit" button for each article, which sets the editing state variable and populates the form with the article's current values.

3. Modify the App component to handle deleting articles:

				
					javascriptCopy code
function deleteArticle(id) {
  axios.delete(`https://my-rest-api.com/articles/${id}`)
    .then(res => {
      setArticles(articles.filter(article => article.id !== id));
    })
    .catch(err => {
      console.error(err);
    });
}

{articles.map(article => (
  <div key={article.id}><h2>{article.title}</h2><p>{article.content}</p><button type="button" onClick={() => editArticle(article)}>Edit</button><button type="button" onClick={() => deleteArticle(article.id)}>Delete</button></div>
))}
				
			

In this modified App component, we added a deleteArticle function that sends a DELETE request to our REST API to delete the article. We also added a "Delete" button for each article that calls this function when clicked.

Step 6: Deployment

To deploy our ReactJS application, we need to build it first. Here's how:

1. Install the serve package:

				
					Copy code
npm install -g serve
				
			

This package allows us to serve our built application.

2. Build the application:

				
					Copy code
npm run build
				
			

This command will create a build folder in our project directory.

3. Serve the application:

				
					Copy code
serve -s build
				
			

This command will serve the built application on http://localhost:5000.

We can now deploy our application to a web server. We can use services like Netlify or AWS Amplify to deploy our ReactJS application.

To deploy our ReactJS application using AWS Amplify, we can follow these steps:

1. Sign up for an AWS account and navigate to the AWS Amplify console.

2. Click the "Connect app" button and follow the prompts to connect our GitHub or Bitbucket repository to AWS Amplify.

3. Once our repository is connected, we need to create a new Amplify app. Click the "Create App" button and follow the prompts to create a new app.

4. In the "App Settings" section, we can configure our build settings. We need to set the build command to npm run build and the build output directory to build/.

5. In the "Backend Environment" section, we can configure our REST API backend. We can either create a new backend or connect to an existing one.

6. Once our app and backend are configured, we can deploy our app by clicking the "Deploy" button.

AWS Amplify will automatically build and deploy our ReactJS application to the specified environment.

Conclusion

In this tutorial, we learned how to create a ReactJS application that interacts with an external REST API to create, update, retrieve, and delete articles. We also learned how to deploy our ReactJS application using AWS Amplify.

While this tutorial covered the basics of creating a ReactJS application, there are many more advanced concepts and techniques to explore. By continuing to learn and experiment with ReactJS, we can create powerful and engaging web applications.

ReactJS Learning Resources

ReactJS Learning Resources

  1. Official ReactJS Documentation – https://reactjs.org/docs/getting-started.html
  2. ReactJS Tutorial for Beginners by FreeCodeCamp – https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/react-tutorial-for-beginners/
  3. ReactJS Crash Course by Traversy Media – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBws8MSXN7A
  4. ReactJS Fundamentals by Tyler McGinnis – https://tylermcginnis.com/courses/react-fundamentals/
  5. ReactJS Tutorial by Tania Rascia – https://www.taniarascia.com/getting-started-with-react/
  6. ReactJS Tutorial by Codecademy – https://www.codecademy.com/learn/react-101
  7. ReactJS Tutorial by W3Schools – https://www.w3schools.com/react/default.asp
  8. ReactJS Tutorial by Scrimba – https://scrimba.com/learn/learnreact
  9. ReactJS Tutorial by Fullstack React – https://www.fullstackreact.com/react-for-beginners/

Top ReactJS Books:

  1. “Learning React: A Hands-On Guide to Building Web Applications Using React and Redux” by Kirupa Chinnathambi
  2. “React: Up & Running: Building Web Applications” by Stoyan Stefanov
  3. “React Design Patterns and Best Practices” by Michele Bertoli
  4. “Fullstack React: The Complete Guide to ReactJS and Friends” by Anthony Accomazzo, Ari Lerner, and Nate Murray
  5. “React Cookbook: Create dynamic web apps with React using Redux, Webpack, Node.js, and GraphQL” by Carlos Santana Roldán and Roy Derks
  6. “React Native: Building Mobile Apps with JavaScript” by Bonnie Eisenman
  7. “Pro React 16” by Adam Freeman and Eric Freeman
  8. “Learning React Native: Building Native Mobile Apps with JavaScript” by Bonnie Eisenman
  9. “React Native: Building Native Mobile Apps with JavaScript” by Vlad Bezden and Artemij Fedosejev
  10. “React Native in Action” by Nader Dabit.