Hire Spring Developers

Spring Boot is a popular Java-based framework that is used for building web applications and microservices. Spring Boot provides a number of features that make it an attractive choice for developers, including auto-configuration, which automatically configures Spring and third-party libraries based on the project’s classpath. It also provides a built-in web server, so developers can run their applications without deploying to an external server.
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How to hire a champion Spring Boot Developer?

To hire a champion Spring Boot developer, you should follow these steps:
  1. Identify the skills and experience required: Before you start hiring, define the skills, experience, and qualifications required for the position. You should also consider the type of project and the technology stack to ensure that the candidate has the necessary expertise.
  2. Source candidates: You can source candidates through job boards, professional networks, social media, and referrals. You can also consider partnering with a recruiting agency that specializes in IT and software development.
  3. Screen resumes: Review resumes and cover letters to determine if the candidate has the required experience and skills. Look for relevant education, certifications, and work experience in Spring Boot development.
  4. Conduct initial interviews: Conduct initial interviews to assess the candidate’s technical and soft skills. You can ask questions related to Spring Boot, Java, web development, and software engineering. Also, ask behavioral interview questions to evaluate the candidate’s problem-solving, teamwork, and communication skills.
  5. Technical assessment: Conduct a technical assessment to evaluate the candidate’s proficiency in Spring Boot. You can ask the candidate to solve coding problems or to demonstrate their knowledge of Spring Boot by building a simple application.
  6. Team interview: Conduct a team interview to evaluate how the candidate interacts with other team members. You can ask questions related to teamwork, collaboration, and communication.
  7. Check references: Check references to verify the candidate’s work experience, skills, and qualifications.
Overall, hiring a champion Spring Boot developer requires a combination of technical expertise, problem-solving skills, and strong interpersonal skills. By following these steps, you can identify and hire a candidate who is the right fit for your team and project. Hire now on TechKluster.

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Frequently Asked Questions

All developers on TechKluster are pre-vetted and pre-verified for their skills and background, so you can be sure that the spring developer you hire has the qualifications and experience you need.
Yes, you can hire a spring developer for a short term (minimum 6 months) and long term on TechKluster. For your custom requirements, you can post requisition on the platform and our team will help you to find the right fit.
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Table of Contents

Spring Boot Fundamentals

Spring Boot is a powerful and popular Java-based framework that enables developers to
quickly build web applications and microservices. In this answer, I will provide an overview
of the programming fundamentals of Spring Boot and provide detailed examples of how to use
Spring Boot.

Dependencies and the pom.xml file

 
To start a new Spring Boot project, you need to create a new Maven project and add the
Spring Boot starter dependencies to the pom.xml file. These dependencies include the
Spring Boot starter web, which provides a basic web application setup, and other
dependencies like Spring Boot starter data JPA, which adds support for JPA
(Java Persistence API) data access.
 
Here is an example of a pom.xml file that includes the Spring Boot starter web and data JPA
dependencies:
				
					
<dependencies><dependency><groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId><artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web</artifactId></dependency><dependency><groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId><artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-jpa</artifactId></dependency></dependencies>
				
			

Spring Boot application class

 
The next step is to create a Spring Boot application class that initializes the Spring
application context and configures the web server. This class is typically annotated with
@SpringBootApplication, which is a combination of several Spring annotations, including
@Configuration, @EnableAutoConfiguration, and @ComponentScan.
 
Here is an example of a Spring Boot application class:
				
					
@SpringBootApplicationpublic class MyApp {

   public static void main(String[] args) {
       SpringApplication.run(MyApp.class, args);
   }
}
				
			

Creating RESTful endpoints 

 
Spring Boot provides a simple and powerful way to create RESTful endpoints using the Spring MVC (Model-View-Controller) framework. You can use the @RestController annotation to create a controller that handles HTTP requests and returns JSON responses.
 
Here is an example of a RESTful endpoint that returns a list of books:
				
					
@RestController@RequestMapping("/api/books")
public class BookController {

   @Autowired
   private BookService bookService;

   @GetMapping
   public List<Book> getAllBooks() {
       return bookService.getAllBooks();
   }
}

				
			

Spring Data JPA 

 
Spring Boot provides support for Spring Data JPA, which simplifies the process of creating database-driven applications. Spring Data JPA provides an abstraction layer over JPA, allowing you to interact with the database using Java objects.
 
Here is an example of a Spring Data JPA repository interface that defines CRUD (create, read, update, delete) operations for a Book entity:
				
					
@Repositorypublic interface BookRepository extends JpaRepository<Book, Long> {

}
				
			

Spring Security

 
Spring Boot provides support for Spring Security, which enables you to secure your web application using various authentication and authorization strategies. You can use the @EnableWebSecurity annotation to enable Spring Security in your application.
Here is an example of a Spring Security configuration class that enables basic authentication:
				
					
@Configuration@EnableWebSecuritypublic class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

   @Overrideprotected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
       http.authorizeRequests()
           .anyRequest().authenticated()
           .and()
           .httpBasic();
   }

   @Autowiredpublic void configureGlobal(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
       auth.inMemoryAuthentication()
           .withUser("user").password("{noop}password").roles("USER");
   }
}
				
			
In conclusion, Spring Boot provides a comprehensive and easy-to-use framework for building web applications and microservices. By following these programming fundamentals and using Spring Boot’s powerful features, you can quickly and efficiently build robust and scalable applications.
 
 

Simple Spring Boot Application

This is how to create a Spring Boot application that allows you to create, update, and retrieve articles with a REST API using Spring Data and an in-memory database.
 

Step 1: Setting up the development environment

To get started, you’ll need to set up your development environment. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Java Development Kit (JDK) 8 or later
  • Maven or Gradle build tool
  • An integrated development environment (IDE) like IntelliJ IDEA, Eclipse, or Visual Studio Code

Once you have your development environment set up, you can start creating your Spring Boot application.
 

Step 2: Creating a new Spring Boot application

To create a new Spring Boot application, you can use the Spring Initialize. Here’s how:
 
Go to https://start.spring.io/ and choose the following options:
 
 . Project: Maven Project
 . Language: Java
 . Spring Boot: 2.5.0
 . Group: com.example
 . Artifact: articles
 . Name: articles
 .  Description: Spring Boot application for creating, updating, and retrieving articles with a REST API
 . Packaging: Jar
 . Java: 11
 
Click on “Add dependencies” and add the following dependencies:
 .Spring Web
 .Spring Data JPA
 .H2 Database
 
Click on “Generate” and download the zip file.
 .Extract the zip file and import the project into your IDE.
 

Step 3: Creating the Article entity

Now that you have your Spring Boot project set up, you can start creating your Article entity. An entity represents a table in the database.
 
  1. Create a new package called “com.example.articles.entity” and create a new Java class called “Article”.
  2. Add the following code to the Article class:
				
					
@Entity@Table(name = "articles")
public class Article {

   @Id@GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
   private Long id;

   private String title;

   @Column(columnDefinition = "TEXT")
   private String content;

   // getters and setters

}
				
			
This code defines an entity called “Article” with three fields: id, title, and content. The @Entity annotation tells Spring Data that this class represents a table in the database. The @Table annotation specifies the name of the table.
 

Step 4: Creating the Article repository

Next, you’ll need to create a repository to interact with the Article entity. The repository provides methods to create, read, update, and delete records in the database.
 
  1. Create a new package called “com.example.articles.repository” and create a new interface called “ArticleRepository”.
  2. Add the following code to the ArticleRepository interface:
				
					
@Repositorypublic interface ArticleRepository extends JpaRepository<Article, Long> {

}
				
			
This code extends the JpaRepository interface, which provides basic CRUD operations. The @Repository annotation tells Spring Data that this interface is a repository.
 

Step 5: Creating the Article service

Now that you have a repository, you can create a service that uses the repository to interact with the database.
 
  1. Create a new package called “com.example.articles.service” and create a new class called “ArticleService”.
  2. Add the following code to the ArticleService class:
				
					
@Servicepublic class ArticleService {

   @Autowiredprivate ArticleRepository articleRepository;

   public List<Article> getAllArticles() {
       return articleRepository.findAll();
   }

   public Article getArticleById(Long id) {
       return articleRepository.findById(id)
               .orElseThrow(() -> new EntityNotFoundException("Article not found"));
   }

   public Article createArticle(Article article) {
       return articleRepository.save(article);
}
public Article updateArticle(Long id, Article article) {
Article existingArticle = articleRepository.findById(id)
.orElseThrow(() -> new EntityNotFoundException("Article not found"));
   existingArticle.setTitle(article.getTitle());
   existingArticle.setContent(article.getContent());

   return articleRepository.save(existingArticle);
}
public void deleteArticle(Long id) {
articleRepository.deleteById(id);
}
}
				
			
This code defines a service called “ArticleService” with methods to get all articles, get an article by ID, create an article, update an article, and delete an article. The @Service annotation tells Spring that this class is a service. The @Autowired annotation injects the ArticleRepository into the service.
 

Step 6: Creating the Article controller

Now that you have a service, you can create a REST API controller that uses the service to handle HTTP requests.
 
1. Create a new package called “com.example.articles.controller” and create a new class called “ArticleController”.
 
2. Add the following code to the ArticleController class:
				
					@RestController
@RequestMapping("/api/articles")
public class ArticleController {
@Autowired
private ArticleService articleService;
@GetMapping
public List<Article> getAllArticles() {
return articleService.getAllArticles();
}
@GetMapping("/{id}")
public Article getArticleById(@PathVariable Long id) {
return articleService.getArticleById(id);
}
@PostMapping
public Article createArticle(@RequestBody Article article) {
return articleService.createArticle(article);
}
@PutMapping("/{id}")
public Article updateArticle(@PathVariable Long id, @RequestBody Article article) {
return articleService.updateArticle(id, article);
}
@DeleteMapping("/{id}")
public void deleteArticle(@PathVariable Long id) {
articleService.deleteArticle(id);
}
}
				
			
This code defines a controller called “ArticleController” with methods to get all articles, get an article by ID, create an article, update an article, and delete an article. The @RestController annotation tells Spring that this class is a REST controller. The @Autowired annotation injects the ArticleService into the controller. The @GetMapping, @PostMapping, @PutMapping, and @DeleteMapping annotations map HTTP requests to the appropriate methods.
 

Step 7: Testing the application

Now that you have your Spring Boot application set up, you can test it by running the application and making HTTP requests to the API.
 
  1. Run the application by running the ArticlesApplication class.
 
  1. Open your web browser and go to http://localhost:8080/api/articles. This should return an empty array because there are no articles in the database yet.
 
  1. Use a tool like Postman to make HTTP requests to the API to create, update, and retrieve articles. For example, you can use a POST request to http://localhost:8080/api/articles with a JSON body like this:
				
					{
"title": "My first article",
"content": "This is my first article using Spring Boot"
}
				
			
This should create a new article in the database and return the article with an ID.
 
4. Use HTTP requests to retrieve, update, and delete articles as well.
 

Step 8: Deploying the application

Once you have tested your Spring Boot application and are satisfied with the functionality, you can deploy it to a server.
 
  1. Package the application by running mvn package in the project directory. This will create a JAR file in the target directory.
 
  1. Upload the JAR file to your server.
 
  1. Run the application on the server by running java -jar articles.jar. This will start the application on port 8080.
 
  1. Access the application from a web browser by going to http://yourserver.com:8080/api/articles.
 
Note that this is just a basic example of how to create a Spring Boot application with a REST API using Spring Data and an in-memory database. You can customize and expand upon this example to fit your specific needs.
 
Also, note that this example uses an in-memory database, which means that the data will be lost if the application is restarted. If you want to use a persistent database like MySQL or PostgreSQL, you can configure Spring Data to use one of these databases instead of an in-memory database.
In conclusion, Spring Boot is a powerful framework for creating Java web applications quickly and easily. With Spring Boot, you can create a REST API with minimal boilerplate code and use Spring Data to interact with databases. This tutorial has covered the basics of creating a Spring Boot application with a REST API, but there is much more to learn about Spring Boot and its various features and capabilities.
 

Spring Boot Learning Resources

Here are some learning resources for Spring Boot:
 
  1. Spring Boot documentation – The official Spring Boot documentation is a great place to start learning about Spring Boot. It provides detailed information about all aspects of the framework.
  2. Spring Boot tutorials on Baeldung – Baeldung is a popular Java learning website that offers many in-depth tutorials on Spring Boot. The Spring Boot section covers a wide range of topics, from getting started to advanced features.
  3. Spring Boot tutorials on JavaBrains – JavaBrains is a YouTube channel that offers video tutorials on various Java topics, including Spring Boot. The Spring Boot playlist covers many topics, from getting started to advanced features.
  4. Spring Boot in Action – This book by Craig Walls provides a comprehensive introduction to Spring Boot. It covers all aspects of the framework, from the basics to advanced topics, and includes many practical examples.
  5. Learning Spring Boot 2.0 – This book by Greg L. Turnquist provides a hands-on guide to learning Spring Boot. It covers all aspects of the framework, from the basics to advanced topics, and includes many practical examples.
  6. Spring Boot 2 Recipes – This book by Marten Deinum and Daniel Rubio provides a collection of recipes for solving common problems with Spring Boot. It covers a wide range of topics, from configuration to deployment.
  7. Mastering Spring Boot 2.0 – This book by Dinesh Rajput provides a comprehensive guide to mastering Spring Boot. It covers all aspects of the framework, from the basics to advanced topics, and includes many practical examples.
 
These are just a few of the many learning resources available for Spring Boot. By using a combination of these resources, you can quickly become proficient in Spring Boot and start building powerful web applications.