Hire JavaScript Developers

JavaScript is mainly used to add interactivity to web pages by allowing developers to create dynamic effects, animations, and user interface components. It is a versatile language that can be used on both client-side and server-side development, and it is compatible with almost all modern web browsers.
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How to hire a champion JavaScript Developer?

Hiring a champion JavaScript developer can be a daunting task, but here are some tips that can help:
 
  1. Look for candidates with experience: Look for candidates who have experience working with JavaScript, particularly those who have worked on complex projects in the past. You can look for candidates who have contributed to open-source projects or have a portfolio of their work.
  2. Test their skills: You can conduct technical interviews or coding tests to evaluate the candidate’s skills in JavaScript. Ask them to solve problems and explain their thought process while doing so.
  3. Assess their knowledge of related technologies: A good JavaScript developer should also be proficient in related technologies such as HTML, CSS, and front-end frameworks like React, Angular, or Vue. Make sure to assess the candidate’s knowledge of these technologies as well.
  4. Look for a good cultural fit: A champion JavaScript developer should not only have the necessary technical skills but also be a good cultural fit for your team. Look for candidates who share your company’s values and are passionate about their work.
  5. Check their references: Always check references provided by the candidate to verify their experience and get insights from their previous colleagues.
  6. Consider remote work: Don’t limit your search to local candidates. Consider hiring a remote JavaScript developer who has experience working remotely and has the necessary communication skills to work with your team.                                                  
By following these tips, you’ll be better equipped to hire a champion JavaScript developer who can help take your project to the next level. Hire now on Techkluster.

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Are you skilled in JavaScript Programming?

As a JavaScript programmer, you have the opportunity to register on our platform and enter into the talent pool. This talent pool is a carefully curated list of JavaScript programmers who have demonstrated exceptional programming skills and expertise in the JavaScript language.

By being a part of the talent pool, you will have access to top-tier job opportunities from the world’s leading companies and startups. Our team works tirelessly to connect you with the best possible opportunities, giving you the chance to work on exciting projects and develop your skills even further.

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Frequently Asked Questions

All developers on TechKluster are pre-vetted and pre-verified for their skills and background, so you can be sure that the JavaScript developer you hire has the qualifications and experience you need.
Yes, you can hire a JavaScript developer for a short term (minimum 6 months) and long term on TechKluster. For your custom requirements, you can post requisition on the platform and our team will help you to find the right fit.
No, we currently do not support hiring on an hourly basis.
Monthly compensation for a JavaScript developer on TechKluster varies depending on their experience and location.
Payment for hiring a JavaScript developer on TechKluster is handled through the platform’s secure payment system. You will receive an invoice for a resource a hired resource. There are payment options to do wire transfer and credit/debit cards.
If you are not satisfied with the work of a JavaScript developer you hire on TechKluster, you can discuss the issue with the developer and attempt to resolve it. If you are still not satisfied, you can request a refund through TechKluster’s dispute resolution process.

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Developers Resource Center

TechKluster is committed to help JavaScript developers community to achieve their career goals, our developer resource center for JavaScript provides the useful resources which not only will help you succeed at TechKluster but everywhere in your development career. For suggestions email us at [email protected]

Table of Contents

JavaScript Fundamentals

Python is a versatile, high-level programming language that is widely used for web development, data analysis, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. It is known for its simplicity, readability, and ease of use. If you're new to programming or just getting started with Python, this article will cover the fundamentals that you need to know.

Variables and Data Types

Variables are used to store data in JavaScript. They can be declared using the "let", "const", or "var" keywords. The "let" keyword is used to declare variables that can be changed, while "const" is used to declare constants that cannot be changed. The "var" keyword is an older way of declaring variables and has some differences in scope compared to "let" and "const".

Here is an example of declaring and using variables:

				
					
let firstName = 'John';
const PI = 3.14;
var age = 30;

console.log(firstName); // Output: Johnconsole.log(PI); // Output: 3.14console.log(age); // Output: 30

firstName = 'Jane';
console.log(firstName); // Output: Jane// PI = 3.1415; // This will throw an error since PI is a constant
				
			

JavaScript has several built-in data types, including strings, numbers, booleans, null, and undefined.

				
					
let name = 'John';
let age = 30;
let isMarried = false;
let car = null;
let job; // undefinedconsole.log(typeof name); // Output: stringconsole.log(typeof age); // Output: numberconsole.log(typeof isMarried); // Output: booleanconsole.log(typeof car); // Output: objectconsole.log(typeof job); // Output: undefined
				
			

Control Flow

Control flow is used to control the order in which code is executed. The most common control flow structures in JavaScript are conditional statements and loops.

Conditional statements are used to execute code based on a condition. The most common conditional statements in JavaScript are "if", "else if", and "else".

				
					
let age = 18;

if (age >= 18) {
  console.log('You can vote');
} else {
  console.log('You cannot vote');
}
				
			

Loops are used to execute code repeatedly. The most common loops in JavaScript are "for", "while", and "do while".

				
					
function sum(a, b) {
  return a + b;
}

console.log(sum(1, 2)); // Output: 3
				
			

Functions

Functions are blocks of code that can be executed repeatedly. They can take input in the form of parameters and return output using the “return” keyword.

Here is an example of a function that takes two parameters and returns their sum:

				
					
function sum(a, b) {
  return a + b;
}

console.log(sum(1, 2)); // Output: 3
				
			

Functions can also be assigned to variables, passed as arguments to other functions, and returned from functions.

Objects

Objects are used to store data and functions together in a single container. They are defined using curly braces {} and can contain properties and methods.

Here is an example of defining an object and accessing its properties:

				
					
let person = {
  firstName: 'John',
  lastName: 'Doe',
  age: 30,
  getFullName: function() {
    return this.firstName + ' ' + this.lastName;
  }
};

console.log(person.firstName); // Output: Johnconsole
console.log(person.getFullName()); // Output: John Doe
				
			

Objects can also be nested inside other objects and can be created using constructor functions and classes.

Arrays

Arrays are used to store multiple values in a single variable. They are defined using square brackets [] and can contain any type of data.

Here is an example of creating an array and accessing its elements:

				
					let numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
console.log(numbers[0]); // Output: 1
console.log(numbers.length); // Output: 5
				
			

Arrays also have built-in methods, such as "push", "pop", "shift", and "unshift", that allow elements to be added or removed from the array.

				
					let fruits = ['apple', 'banana'];
fruits.push('orange');
console.log(fruits); // Output: ['apple', 'banana', 'orange']
fruits.pop();
console.log(fruits); // Output: ['apple', 'banana']
				
			

Conclusion:

In conclusion, JavaScript is a powerful and flexible programming language that is widely used for web development. This article has covered the fundamental concepts of JavaScript, including variables, data types, control flow, functions, objects, and arrays. With this knowledge, beginners can start exploring the vast ecosystem of JavaScript libraries and frameworks to build dynamic and interactive web applications.

Sample JavaScript Application

For the purpose of this example, let's assume that the API we're interacting with has the following endpoints: - GET /articles: Returns a list of all articles in the API. - POST /articles: Creates a new article. - PUT /articles/:id: Updates an article with a specific ID. - GET /articles/:id: Retrieves an article with a specific ID. To interact with this API, we'll be using the fetch function provided by modern web browsers. This function allows us to make HTTP requests to external APIs and handle the responses in a convenient way. First, let's start by creating a module that will handle our API interactions. We'll create a file called api.js and export an object with four methods: getArticles, createArticle, updateArticle, and getArticle.

				
					
const API_BASE_URL = 'https://example.com/api';

const api = {
  async getArticles() {
    const response = await fetch(`${API_BASE_URL}/articles`);
    const data = await response.json();
    return data;
  },
  async createArticle(article) {
    const response = await fetch(`${API_BASE_URL}/articles`, {
      method: 'POST',
      headers: { 'Content-Type': 'application/json' },
      body: JSON.stringify(article),
    });
    const data = await response.json();
    return data;
  },
  async updateArticle(id, article) {
    const response = await fetch(`${API_BASE_URL}/articles/${id}`, {
      method: 'PUT',
      headers: { 'Content-Type': 'application/json' },
      body: JSON.stringify(article),
    });
    const data = await response.json();
    return data;
  },
  async getArticle(id) {
    const response = await fetch(`${API_BASE_URL}/articles/${id}`);
    const data = await response.json();
    return data;
  },
};

export default api;
				
			

Now that we have our API module, we can create a simple user interface that allows us to interact with it. For the purpose of this example, we'll create a form that allows us to create new articles, and a table that displays all existing articles and allows us to update and delete them.

We'll create a file called app.js and include it in an HTML file with the following structure:

				
					<!--
<!DOCTYPE html><html lang="en"><head><meta charset="UTF-8"><title> Articles </title></head><body><h2>Articles</h2><form id="create-article-form"><label for="title">Title:</label><input type="text" id="title" name="title" required><br><label for="content">Content:</label><textarea id="content" name="content" required></textarea><br><button type="submit">Create</button></form><table id="articles-table"><thead><tr><th>ID</th><th>Title</th><th>Content</th><th>Actions</th></tr></thead><tbody></tbody></table><script type="module" src="app.js"></script></body></html> -->
				
			

This HTML file includes a form with two input fields (title and content) and a submit button, and a table with four columns (ID, Title, Content, and Actions). We've also included a script tag that loads our app.js file as a module.

Now let's write the code for our app.js module. We'll start by importing our api.js module and the HTML elements we'll be working with.

				
					
import api from './api. js';

const createArticleForm = document.getElementById('create-article-form');
const articlesTableBody = document.querySelector('#articles-table tbody');
				
			

Next, let's create a function that will display all existing articles in our table. We'll call this function displayArticles and we'll use the getArticles method from our API module to fetch the data.

				
					
async function displayArticles() {
  const articles = await api.getArticles();

  articlesTableBody.innerHTML = '';

  for (const article of articles) {
    const tr = document.createElement('tr');
    tr.innerHTML = `
      <td>${article.id}</td>
      <td>${article.title}</td>
      <td>${article.content}</td>
      <td>
        <button class="edit-article-button" data-article-id="${article.id}">Edit</button>
        <button class="delete-article-button" data-article-id="${article.id}">Delete</button>
      </td>
    `;
    articlesTableBody.appendChild(tr);
  }
}
				
			

This function first calls getArticles and awaits its response. It then clears the tbody of our table and creates a new tr element for each article, populating its cells with the article's properties (id, title, and content) and adding two buttons (Edit and Delete) with a data-article-id attribute set to the article's ID.

We'll also need a function to handle the submission of our create article form. This function will be called handleCreateArticleFormSubmit and it will use the createArticle method from our API module to send the form data to the API.

				
					
createArticleForm.addEventListener('submit', async event => {
  event.preventDefault();

  const formData = new FormData(event.target);
  const title = formData.get('title');
  const content = formData.get('content');

  await api.createArticle({ title, content });

  createArticleForm.reset();
  await displayArticles();
});
				
			

This function first prevents the default form submission behavior (which would cause a page reload), then creates a FormData object from the form element and extracts the values of the title and content fields. It then calls createArticle with an object containing these values, and awaits the response. Finally, it resets the form and calls displayArticles to update the table.

Next, we'll create a function to handle the click event on our Edit buttons. This function will be called handleEditArticleButtonClick and it will display a form that allows us to update the selected article.

				
					
articlesTableBody.addEventListener('click', async event => {
  if (event.target.matches('.edit-article-button')) {
    const articleId = event.target.dataset.articleId;
    const article = await api.getArticle(articleId);

    const tr = event.target.closest('tr');
    tr.innerHTML = `
      <td>${article.id}</td>
      <td><input type="text" name="title" value="${article.title}" required></td>
      <td><textarea name="content" required>${article.content}</textarea></td>
      <td>
        <button class="update-article-button" data-article-id="${article.id}">Update</button>
        <button class="cancel-update-article-button" data-article-id="${article.id}">Cancel</button>
      </td>
    `;
 
				
			

This function first checks if the clicked element matches the .edit-article-button selector. If it does, it retrieves the article ID from the data-article-id attribute of the button and calls getArticle to fetch the article data.

It then selects the closest tr element (which represents the row of the clicked button) and replaces its content with a new form that allows us to update the article's title and content. The form includes two buttons (Update and Cancel) with a data-article-id attribute set to the article's ID.

We'll need another function to handle the submission of the update form. This function will be called handleUpdateArticleFormSubmit and it will use the updateArticle method from our API module to send the updated article data to the API.

				
					
articlesTableBody.addEventListener('click', async event => {
  if (event.target.matches('.update-article-button')) {
    const formData = new FormData(event.target.closest('tr'));
    const title = formData.get('title');
    const content = formData.get('content');
    const articleId = event.target.dataset.articleId;

    await api.updateArticle(articleId, { title, content });
    await displayArticles();
  }
});
				
			

This function first retrieves the form data from the closest tr element of the clicked button, extracts the values of the title and content fields, and retrieves the article ID from the data-article-id attribute of the button.

It then calls updateArticle with the article ID and an object containing the updated title and content, and awaits the response. Finally, it calls displayArticles to update the table.

We'll also need a function to handle the click event on our Cancel buttons. This function will be called handleCancelUpdateArticleButtonClick and it will cancel the update and restore the original article data.

				
					
articlesTableBody.addEventListener('click', async event => {
  if (event.target.matches('.cancel-update-article-button')) {
    const articleId = event.target.dataset.articleId;
    const article = await api.getArticle(articleId);

    const tr = event.target.closest('tr');
    tr.innerHTML = `
      <td>${article.id}</td>
      <td>${article.title}</td>
      <td>${article.content}</td>
      <td>
        <button class="edit-article-button" data-article-id="${article.id}">Edit</button>
        <button class="delete-article-button" data-article-id="${article.id}">Delete</button>
      </td>
    `;
  }
});
				
			

This function retrieves the article ID from the data-article-id attribute of the clicked button and calls getArticle to fetch the original article data.

It then selects the closest tr element (which represents the row of the clicked button) and replaces its content with the original article data, including the Edit and Delete buttons.

Finally, we'll create a function to handle the click event on our Delete buttons. This function will be called handleDeleteArticleButtonClick and it will use the deleteArticle method from our API module to delete the selected article.

				
					
articlesTableBody.addEventListener('click', async event => {
  if (event.target.matches('.delete-article-button')) {
    const articleId = event.target.dataset.articleId;
    await api.deleteArticle(articleId);
    await displayArticles();
  }
});
				
			

This function retrieves the article ID from the data-article-id attribute of the clicked button and calls deleteArticle with this ID. It then awaits the response and calls displayArticles to update the table.

And that's it! We now have a complete JavaScript application

JavaScript Learning Resources

here are some online free JavaScript learning resources and books:
  1. MDN Web Docs: JavaScript Guide – A comprehensive guide to learning JavaScript, from basic to advanced concepts. The guide is free and available online: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Guide
  2. Eloquent JavaScript – A popular book on JavaScript that is available for free online: https://eloquentjavascript.net/
  3. JavaScript.info – A free online JavaScript tutorial that covers both basic and advanced topics: https://javascript.info/
  4. Codecademy – An interactive online platform that offers free and paid courses on JavaScript: https://www.codecademy.com/learn/introduction-to-javascript
  5. freeCodeCamp – A non-profit organization that offers free coding education, including courses on JavaScript: https://www.freecodecamp.org/learn/javascript-algorithms-and-data-structures/
  6. You Don’t Know JS – A book series that covers in-depth JavaScript concepts, available for free on GitHub: https://github.com/getify/You-Dont-Know-JS
  7. Speaking JavaScript – A book that covers both basic and advanced JavaScript concepts, available for free online: http://speakingjs.com/
  8. JavaScript for Cats – A beginner-friendly guide to learning JavaScript, available for free online: https://jsforcats.com/
  9. Mozilla Developer Network – JavaScript – A collection of free resources and documentation on JavaScript, available online: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript
I hope these resources help you in your journey to learn JavaScript!